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January 2019

American Indian Seminar – Tony Yates

January 22 @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
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Academic Conference Series for Social Sciences & Humanities Students Part 1

January 22 @ 12:30 pm - 2:00 pm

ACADEMIC CONFERENCES 101 – PART 1: THE BASICS Join us for Part 1 of the “Academic Conference Series for Social Sciences & Humanities Students”. Part 1: The Basics will cover everything you need to know to successfully investigate, apply to, fund and attend academic conferences. LUNCH PROVIDED!! SPACE LIMITED!! WHEN: Tues. Jan. 22nd 12:30-2:00PM WHERE: Student Activities Center, Conference Room 2 RSVP MANDATORY:  https://goo.gl/forms/fjOiEHdWzyHg8vwi1 Hosted by the GSRC Programming Committee, 1st Gen Student Specialist, Letty Trevino (PhD, Spanish & Portuguese)

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Faculty Meeting – Phonology & Syntax search committee report

January 18 @ 9:00 am - 1:00 pm
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Psycholinguistics Seminar: Journal club on Interference in memory (Allie leading)

January 17 @ 4:00 pm - 5:50 pm
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The Secret of Immortality: Alejandro Jodorowsky’s The Holy Mountain

January 17 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Please join the Spanish and Portuguese Department for a presentation by Prof. Alessandra Santos, University of British Columbia! Reception to Follow Alessandra Santos is Associate Professor of Hispanic Studies. Her publications include the books Arnaldo Canibal Antunes (2013), The Holy Mountain (2017), and two volumes on utopia: The Utopian Impulse in Latin America (2011), and Performing Utopias in the Contemporary Americas (2017, co-edited with Kim Beauchesne). Alejandro Jodorowsky’s El topo (1970) helped inaugurate the midnight movie phenomenon. Its success spawned The…

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French Lunch

January 17 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
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SEEE Films Presents: Three Seconds

January 16 @ 7:00 pm
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WHAT DID THE CHRONICLES REALLY MEAN TO SAY?

January 16 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Revisiting the Laurentian and Hypatian Chronicle Accounts About the Failed Raid of Prince Igor Svjatoslavic in 1185.  A talk by Professor Harvey Goldblatt, Yale University Harvey Goldblatt is a Professor of Medieval Slavic Literature in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Yale University. He is the author of numerous publications on general problems of language debates in the Slavic world as well as on specific works that deal with language speculation in and the literary patrimony of Slavia…

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Bayesian Reading Group

January 16 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
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Chinese Lunch

January 16 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
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Syntax Seminar – Vahideh Rasekhi: “Two types of why in syntax: Evidence from Why-stripping in Persian”

January 15 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Two types of why in syntax: Evidence from Why-stripping in Persian This talk is an attempt to get audience feedback on my work in progress and prepare for my presentation at “Sluicing and Ellipsis at 50”, which will be held at the University of Chicago in April. In this work, I provide an account of why-stripping in Persian (1), in which there is a wh-phrase cherā ‘why’ and a non-wh-phrase remnant (e.g. chips).This structure looks similar to sluicing with why,…

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Syntax Seminar: Vahideh Rasekhi

January 15 @ 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Two types of why in syntax: Evidence from Why-stripping in Persian This talk is an attempt to get audience feedback on my work in progress and prepare for my presentation at “Sluicing and Ellipsis at 50”, which will be held at the University of Chicago in April. In this work, I provide an account of why-stripping in Persian (1), in which there is a wh-phrase cherā ‘why’ and a non-wh-phrase remnant (e.g. chips).This structure looks similar to sluicing with why, as in (2), in which there is only a wh-phrase remnant cherā ‘why’. The question is whether why in…

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Buenos Aires Information Session

January 15 @ 2:00 pm - 3:30 pm

Come learn about the department’s Buenos Aires Summer Travel Study program from Program Director, Professor Adriana Bergero! Please click here to RSVP.

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American Indian Seminar – Zhou Chen

January 15 @ 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
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“This is What I Have on My Bookshelf”: Jewish Autobiography and Descriptive Bibliography in the Islamic West

January 14 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

The 28th Richard and Mary Rouse History of the Book Lecture This year’s History of the Book Lecture by Professor S.J. Pearce (NYU, Art & Science) explores the relationship between descriptive bibliography — writing in a detailed way about the contents of a library — and autobiography in the writing lives of medieval Jews and converts from Judaism in the Islamic west, that is, Spain and North Africa. It will look at autobiographical writings in which detailed library catalogues are included and…

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Phonetics Seminar: Connor Mayer, “Modeling developmental changes in the infants’ discrimination of English vowels”

January 14 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
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Colloquium: Nicholas Shea, School of Advanced Study, University of London

January 11 @ 3:30 pm - 6:00 pm

January 11, 2019 @ 3:30 pm – 6:00 pm Nicholas Shea, School of Advanced Study, University of London Friday, January 11 at 3:30 pm Location TBA Title TBA

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Phonology Seminar: Beth Sturman, “Lenition, Learnability and the P-map” (practice poster for Old World Conference in Phonology)

January 9 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
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American Indian Seminar – ‘Say’ Fest (see below)

January 8 @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Every quarter we have a Fest on some topic of general interest. This quarter it’s a ‘Say’ Fest (thanks, Travis!!). If you’d like to share some linguistic tidbit about how ‘say’ works in any language (because every language is indigenous to somewhere) — constructions? inflection? quotatives? … — please bring 10-15 copies of a handout and be prepared to talk for 5-15 minutes, depending on how many people want to participate. But even if you don’t want to, please come!

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Phonetics Seminar – Organizational Meeting

January 7 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
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