Humanities

Claude Calame: “The Creation of Eve and Pandora in ‘Differential Comparison’: Myths of Foundation and Michel Foucault’s ‘Aveux de la Chair’”

Published: May 9, 2022

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER About the Lecture In his History of Sexuality, Michel Foucault intends to offer a “genealogy of the subject of desire” and of the “arts of existence” through the experience of the flesh, in the comparative passage from the Greco-Roman paradigm to Christianity in the first centuries. Relying on philosophers, moralists, physicians,…

Panayotis (Paddy) League, “Echoes of the Great Catastrophe: Re-Sounding Anatolian Greekness in Diaspora”

Published: May 7, 2022

In this talk, Dr. Panayotis League explores the legacy of the “Great Catastrophe”—the death and expulsion from Turkey of 1.5 million Greek Christians following the Greco-Turkish War of 1919–1922—through the music and dance practices of Greek refugees and their descendants over the last one hundred years. Drawing on original ethnographic research conducted in Greece (on the island…

Heim Memorial Lecture: “Translating Erased Histories” with Dr. Maureen Freely

Published: May 3, 2022

Fethiye Çetin with her grandmother This lecture wiLl be presented via Zoom Webinar CLICK HERE TO REGISTER   About the Lecture 20 years ago, a loose-knit collective of Turkish journalists, lawyers, writers, publishers, and social justice advocates banded together to tell the truth about the Armenian genocide to the Turkish people, who had by then…

Bilingual Lecture Series: Fatemeh Shams

Published: May 1, 2022

تنش شعر و قدرت در ایران ِ پس از انقلاب The Tension Between Poetry and Power in Post-Revolutionary Iran شعر و شاعران چه نقشی در پیروزی انقلاب ۵۷ و به مسند نشاندن حاکمان جمهوری اسلامی داشتند؟ چرا حاکمان جمهوری اسلامی به شعر اهمیت می‌دهند؟‌ شاعران حکومتی چه کسانی هستند و چگونه به عرصه شعر بعد…

Confounding the Critics, Surviving the Scandal: The Remarkable Reputation of Oscar Wilde

Published: April 28, 2022

William Andrews Clark Lecture on Oscar Wilde Given by Merlin Holland This lecture will be livestreamed on the Center’s YouTube Channel and available to watch for a limited time following the event. “Confounding the Critics, Surviving the Scandal: The Remarkable Reputation of Oscar Wilde,” examines Wilde in the context of the 1890s and addresses the question of why…

Iran Unglazed: Local, National, and Global Histories of Persian Tilework

Published: April 27, 2022

Wednesday, April 27, 2022 at 11:00am Pacific Time via Zoom Registration Required This talk examines the many ways in which Persian tilework has been packaged and interpreted between the field, museum, and photograph. At stake is a balancing act between prevailing narratives of world heritage and local and national histories, as well as the reconciliation…

Ute Heidmann: “Differential, Dialogical, and Plurilingual Comparativism”

Published: April 25, 2022

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER   About the Lecture Differentiation denotes the process that relates the same to the different instead of opposing them. The evolution of all languages, literatures, and cultures seems to be underlain by such a complex process of differentiation. In order to explore this complex process, I developed a comparative method applying…

Victorian Apocalypse: The siècle at its fin, Conference 3: Exhaustion/Entropy/Extraction

Published: April 23, 2022

Presented online via Zoom Meeting Organized by Joseph Bristow (University of California, Los Angeles), Neil Hultgren (California State University, Long Beach) and Elizabeth Carolyn Miller (University of California, Davis) During  the 2021–22 academic year, the  UCLA Center for 17th- & 18th-Century Studies and William Andrews Clark Memorial Library  will host the Core  Program entitled “Victorian Apocalypse: The …

Victorian Apocalypse: The siècle at its fin, Conference 3: Exhaustion/Entropy/Extraction

Published: April 22, 2022

Presented online via Zoom Meeting Organized by Joseph Bristow (University of California, Los Angeles), Neil Hultgren (California State University, Long Beach) and Elizabeth Carolyn Miller (University of California, Davis) During  the 2021–22 academic year, the  UCLA Center for 17th- & 18th-Century Studies and William Andrews Clark Memorial Library  will host the Core  Program entitled “Victorian Apocalypse: The …

UCLA Department of Classics Joan Palevsky Lecture | Dr Jennifer Stager, “Cut from the Womb: Towards a Feminist History of Ancient Greek Medicine”

Published: April 22, 2022

The UCLA Classics Department is pleased to announce that the Joan Palevsky Lecture in Classics for 2022 will be delivered by Jennifer Stager, Assistant Professor of History of Art at Johns Hopkins University. Taking its title from the god Asklepios’s violent birth (Pindar Pythian 3) and the priorities that this myth set for ancient Greek…

Biennial Ehsan Yarshater Lecture Series – Empire and Borderlands at Interplay: A Structural Approach (First Millennium BCE – First Millennium CE)

Published: April 20, 2022

The 2022 Biennial Ehsan Yarshater Lecture Series Featuring Professor Robert Rollinger (University of Innsbruck) The Achaemenid Persian World Empire The series of lectures offers a novel and fresh perspective on one of the largest and most successful empires in world history, namely, the Achaemenid Persian World Empire (sixth to fourth century BCE), the central power…

Biennial Ehsan Yarshater Lecture Series – Space and Universality: The Long Life of the Achaemenid Mental Map in Antiquity and Beyond (Sixth Century BCE – Sixth Century CE)

Published: April 18, 2022

The 2022 Biennial Ehsan Yarshater Lecture Series Featuring Professor Robert Rollinger (University of Innsbruck) The Achaemenid Persian World Empire The series of lectures offers a novel and fresh perspective on one of the largest and most successful empires in world history, namely, the Achaemenid Persian World Empire (sixth to fourth century BCE), the central power…

Paulin Ismard: “Comparatism and Slavery: Methods, Definitions, Issues”

Published: April 18, 2022

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER About the Lecture I would like first to question the benefit that specialists of Greco-Roman slavery can gain from dialogue with the historians of slavery from other periods. Considering the question of the relationship between debt, servitude and slavery in archaic Greece, I will first show how recent approaches in the…

Roderick Beaton, “Asia Minor in the Life and Work of George Seferis”

Published: April 16, 2022

A Celebration of National Poetry Month

In May 1944, at the height of a new crisis facing the Greek government in exile during World War II, which he served as a high-ranking diplomat, George Seferis confided these thoughts to his Alexandrian Greek friend Timos Malanos: ‘It might surprise you if I tell you that the event that has affected me more than anything is the Asia Minor Catastrophe. . . . From the age of 13 I’ve never ceased to be a refugee.’ This talk describes Seferis’s early life in Smyrna and the seaside village of Skala tou Vourla, and the ways in which he came to reflect on both, in later essays and poems. Moving forward to the end of the 1940s, the story resumes when the poet returned to his birthplace while serving in the Greek embassy in Ankara. During this period, traveling widely in Asia Minor, Seferis experienced what he termed a ‘wider Hellenism’, one that encompassed the Hellenistic expansion in the wake of the conquests of Alexander the Great and continued throughout the millennium of the Byzantine Empire. From these later experiences, and the poems, essays, and diaries that he wrote at the time, it emerges that, for Seferis, Asia Minor had become not only his own ‘lost homeland’ and that of his family and more than a million of his contemporaries: it was also the ‘lost homeland’ of Hellenism itself, whose heartland it had been for many centuries.

Roderick Beaton grew up in Edinburgh and studied English Literature at Cambridge, before specializing in Modern Greek studies. For thirty years until his retirement, he held the Koraes Chair of Modern Greek and Byzantine History, Language and Literature at King’s College London, and is now Emeritus. Beaton is the author of several books of non-fiction, one novel, and several translations of fiction and poetry, all of them connected to Greece and the Greek-speaking world. He is a four-time winner of the Runciman Award, and his books have been shortlisted for the Duff Cooper Prize and the Cundill History Prize. He is a Fellow of the British Academy (FBA), a Fellow of King’s College (FKC), and Commander of the Order of Honour of the Hellenic Republic. From 2019 to 2021 he served as a member of the Committee “GREECE 2021,” charged by the Greek government with overseeing events commemorating the 200th anniversary of the start of the Greek Revolution in 1821, and from September to December 2021 as A.G. Leventis Visiting Professor in Greek at the University of Edinburgh. His latest book, The Greeks: A Global History, is published by Basic Books (October 2021).

This event will be introduced by Her Excellency Alexandra Papadopoulou, Ambassador of Greece to the United States.

Exclusive poetry reading by renowned Greek actor Stelios Mainas (Tetarti 04:45, Mystikes Diadromes, The island)