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As Inconvenient and Offensive as Abundance

Zoom Meeting

Adam Talib on “As Inconvenient and Offensive as Abundance.” This lecture is part of the UCLA Program in Experimental Critical Theory co-directed by Giulia Sissa (Political Science/Classics) and Zrinka Stahuljak (Comparative Literature/ELTS). Generously sponsored by the Dean of Humanities and the Dean of Social Sciences and co-sponsored by the CMRS Center for Early Global Studies. Register to...

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Alexander Beecroft: “Contactless Comparison”

Zoom Meeting

About the Lecture It’s easy to compare things that are produced near each other, by people who are able to influence each other. Traditionally, comparative literature has therefore compared literatures in close contact with each other: at first European literatures; later literatures in European languages around the world, and sometimes even contemporary literatures in non-European...

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Matei Candea: “Counting to Two and Counting to Three: Comparative Imaginaries of Freedom of Speech”

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER FOR THE LECTURE About the Lecture Debates over freedom of speech and its proper limits have become a recurrent feature of European and American public life in recent years. This talk examines the inherently comparative logics of these debates, the ways in which they figure and refigure differences between countries, legal...

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Paulin Ismard: “Comparatism and Slavery: Methods, Definitions, Issues”

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER About the Lecture I would like first to question the benefit that specialists of Greco-Roman slavery can gain from dialogue with the historians of slavery from other periods. Considering the question of the relationship between debt, servitude and slavery in archaic Greece, I will first show how recent approaches in the...

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Ute Heidmann: “Differential, Dialogical, and Plurilingual Comparativism”

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER   About the Lecture Differentiation denotes the process that relates the same to the different instead of opposing them. The evolution of all languages, literatures, and cultures seems to be underlain by such a complex process of differentiation. In order to explore this complex process, I developed a comparative method applying...

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Claude Calame: “The Creation of Eve and Pandora in ‘Differential Comparison’: Myths of Foundation and Michel Foucault’s ‘Aveux de la Chair’”

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER About the Lecture In his History of Sexuality, Michel Foucault intends to offer a “genealogy of the subject of desire” and of the “arts of existence” through the experience of the flesh, in the comparative passage from the Greco-Roman paradigm to Christianity in the first centuries. Relying on philosophers, moralists, physicians,...

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Chowra Makaremi: “Reticular, Thick and Liquid: Europe’s New Borders”

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER About the Lecture “Fortress Europe” is not a fortress. The metaphor is useful and successful however, because it points a process which seems self-evident, even if it is far from making sense when we take a closer look: the fact that migration policies have mostly become border policies. European states seek...

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Renaud Gagné: “How to Build Worlds with Altars: Cosmography and the Ritual Archive”

This event has been cancelled About the Speaker Renaud Gagné is Professor in Ancient Greek Literature and Religion at the University of Cambridge, where he has taught in the Faculty of Classics since 2009, and a Fellow of Pembroke College. He has published most recently Regimes of Comparatism: Frameworks of Comparison in History, Religion and Anthropology...

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Neoclassic or New Classics? Challenges, Debates, Perspectives

Zoom Meeting

A roundtable organized and moderated by Professor Giulia Sissa (Departments of Political Science, Comparative Literature and Classics, UCLA). “Decolonizing Classics” is a novel challenge for scholars in the Humanities and, even more pointedly, for those who study the societies of ancient Greece and Rome. The stake is not merely relevance, usefulness or epistemic legitimacy, but...

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Roundtable: Neoclassic or New Classics? Challenges, Debates, Perspectives

Organized and moderated by Professor Giulia Sissa (Classics, Political Science, Comparative Literature – UCLA). Follow this link to register to attend online with Zoom. “Decolonizing Classics” is a novel challenge for scholars in the Humanities and, even more pointedly, for those who study the societies of ancient Greece and Rome. The stake is not merely relevance,...

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