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April 2020

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POSTPONED – Virtual Classrooms and Mercantile Mischief in Shakespeare’s England

April 30 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Ct
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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TO BE RESCHEDULED FALL 2020 - CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture Professor Susan Phillips (English, Northwestern University). What happens when the schoolmaster is banished from the early modern classroom? The popular vernacular textbooks that flooded the European market in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries posed precisely this question when they claimed—on title pages and in prefatory material—not simply to stand in for the schoolmaster, but to displace him altogether. Most were practical how-to guides that offered entertaining dialogues and real-world…

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POSTPONED – The Holy Mountains of the Western Italian Alps: Pilgrimage, Art, and Society in the 16th Century

April 18
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Ct
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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TO BE RESCHEDULED FALL 2020 - CMRS Conference This conference, organized by Geoffrey Symcox (History, UCLA), explores the history and extraordinary art of the Sacri Monti and highlights the contributions of young scholars to this new field of research. The cluster of pilgrimage centers known as the Sacri Monti, or Holy Mountains, in the western Italian Alps, is attracting increasing scholarly attention. In part this is because in 2003 they were named a World Heritage Site by UNESCO, in recognition…

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POSTPONED – Spatial Grammars: The Union of Art and Writing in the Painted Books of Aztec Mexico

April 16 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Ct
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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TO BE RESCHEDULED - Annual Armand Hammer Art History Lecture This lecture by Elizabeth Hill Boone (Art History, Tulane), focuses on the painted books of Aztec Mexico, sixteenth-century documents that some people consider to be works of Art and others consider to contain Writing.  The talk thus explores that place where our Western conceptions of Art and Writing come closest together. The Aztecs and their neighbors conceptualized writing and image-making as a single cultural category, one that involved a nonverbal…

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CANCELED – “Gender, Architecture and Erasure in the Fifteenth-Century Andes”

April 14 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA (CALIFORNIA) 90095
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CANCELED - CMRS Research Workshop Stella Nair (Professor, Art History, UCLA) Women played critical roles throughout Andean History. Yet gender biases set forth in the Iberian colonization of the Andes and continued by scholars have silenced and effectively erased women’s roles in designing, constructing, and giving meaning to the Inca built environment. In this paper, Nair explores how surviving written and material records can provide critical clues to the ways in which indigenous women defined space and place in the…

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March 2020

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CANCELED – “Hypnerotomachia Poliphili” (1499) and the Architecture of Dreams

March 12 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA (CALIFORNIA) 90095
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CANCELED - Demetra Vogiatzaki, History of Architecture, Harvard University 2020 UCLA Ahmanson Research Fellow This presentation investigates the continuum of dreams and architecture staged in Hypnerotomachia Poliphili, a 1499 publication that exerted significant influence in art and architecture for more than two centuries. Published by the press of Aldo Manuzio, the bizarre narrative of Hypnerotomachia unfolds in a series of imaginary worlds dreamed up by the protagonist and is accompanied by 172 woodcuts, most of them illustrating monuments whose designs…

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42nd Annual UC Celtic Studies Conference

March 5 - March 7
UCLA, Royce Hall 314, (Conference Room), 340 Royce Drive
Los Angeles, 90095 United States
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Sponsored by the UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, the Celtic Colloquium, the Department of English, Dean David Schaberg and the Humanities Division, the Program in Indo-European Studies, and the Campus Programs Committee of the Program Activities Board. THURSDAY, MARCH 5 | UCLA ROYCE 314 2:00 Welcoming Remarks SESSION I - Chair: Joseph Nagy (Harvard/UCLA) 2:15 - Abigail Burnyeat (Sabhal Mòr Ostaig, University of the Highlands and Islands) “Ban-shenchus gu seanchas nam ban: Metatext, Audience, and the Co-creation of…

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February 2020

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Dross? Dunghills? Or Musical Treasures? Rethinking Collectors and Collections of Seventeenth-Century Pop Songs

February 20 @ 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
UCLA Faculty Center, 480 Charles E Young Dr East
Los Angeles, 90095
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Annual William & Lois Matthews Samuel Pepys Lecture Angela McShane (Head of Research, Wellcome Collection; Associate Fellow, History, University of Warwick) Pop-music collections are remarkable things: expressing individual taste and evidencing engagement with the products of the music industry, they become nostalgic compilations almost from the first moment of their construction. Judging how far an individual’s collection represents the popular music scene is relatively simple, since charts and catalogues, categorized by genre, ordered by performer, date of release and overall sales,…

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CMRS Research Workshop

February 11 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Royce Hall 306,

“Michael Servetus, his clashes with deans Tagault and Lax, and their serious consequences: his anonymous works from 1538 ahead, and his exile from Spain in 1527” Miguel Gonzalez Ancin (Independent Scholar) This paper examines the medical, grammatical, biblical and poetical works by Michael Servetus – studied by servetian González Echeverría- which were printed anonymously in the print-shop of Jean Frellon in Lyon. The main reason for their anonymity was the fierce trial that Servetus suffered in 1538  by the Univ. of…

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California Medieval History Seminar, Winter 2020

February 8 @ 9:30 am - 4:00 pm
Huntington Library, Seaver Classroom 3, 1151 Oxford Rd
San Marino, CA 91108 United States
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The Winter 2020 session of the California Medieval History Seminar meets at the Huntington Library to discuss four pre-distributed research papers. Participants are scholars in the field at various stages of their careers. All attendees at the seminar are expected to read the papers in advance and discuss the research. Speakers and paper topics are announced by e-mail. Click here for additional information about the seminar. Advance registration is required. Participants must be graduate students or faculty to attend unless pre-approved…

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Annual Colloquium in Armenian Studies

February 7
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Ct
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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Graduate Student Colloquium in Armenian Studies | University of California, Los Angeles | Royce Hall 314 | February 7, 2020 9:30 – 10:00 Breakfast 10:00 – 10:10 Opening Remarks Anatolii Tokmantcev (Director of the 2020 Graduate Student Colloquium in Armenian Studies Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, UCLA) Dr. S. Peter Cowe (Narekatsi Professor of Armenian Studies, Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, UCLA) Panel 1: Homeland and Diaspora: Displacement and its Effects Chair: Armen Adamian, Ethnomusicology, UCLA 10:10 – 10:30 Ani Shahinian, “The…

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“Let the Whole World Praise the Saint”: Medieval Songs for St. Nicholas

February 4 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
UCLA, Royce Hall 314, (Conference Room), 340 Royce Drive
Los Angeles, 90095 United States
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CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture Mary Channen Caldwell (Assistant Professor of Music, University of Pennsylvania). St. Nicholas was unquestionably one of the most popular and accessible saints in medieval Europe, serving as patron saint to everyone from sailors and unmarried women, to clerics, children, and repentant thieves. Due to his role as “everyman’s saint,” Nicholas was, from an early period, widely celebrated in song, drama, and literature in many forms and languages. Among the plentiful music composed in his name, a…

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January 2020

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Early History of Africa Symposium: New Narratives for a History of Connections and Brokers

January 30 @ 1:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Ct
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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This symposium presents an opportunity to think about different methodologies and different ways of writing history when faced with the challenge of sources. Can we still use the traditional narrative within a connected history of brokers, frontiers, and cultural transfers, or should we be thinking about different ways of telling history, developing, for instance, network narratives or fragmented narratives?  Organized by Zrinka Stahuljak (Comparative Literature and French and Francophone Studies; CMRS Director; UCLA) and Stephanie Bosch Santana (Comparative Literature, UCLA).…

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Law and Communal Identity in the Early Medieval World

January 23 - January 25
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Ct
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Conference Organized by Jessica Goldberg (History, UCLA) and Luke Yarborough (Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, UCLA). Click here for the complete conference schedule and additional details >> This conference investigates how law shaped the boundaries of communities in the early medieval period in the Byzantine, Islamic, and European worlds, and how shifting notions of identity and belonging re-shaped legal discourses in their turn. To spur cross-disciplinary discussion, presentations and round-tables will center around participants’ chosen selections of source texts, which will be pre-circulated.…

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In League with Infidels: Sharifs, Persians, Turks and The Renaissance Popes as “Lords and Masters of the World Game”

January 22 @ 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
306 Royce Hall, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Pop-Up Workshop Celine Dauverd (Associate Professor, History, University of Colorado Boulder) The Fall of Constantinople shook the western world. But it also forced the head of the Christian world to reinvent itself. Countless Muslim raids over the Italian peninsula coupled with the need to preserve Rome as a sovereign city-state compelled the papacy to design a new imperial theory. Ignoring the precepts of the bull In coenia domeni and demonstrating instead doctrinal inconsistencies, the rising tide of the Turks constrained the papacy…

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CMRS Research Workshop

January 21 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Royce Hall 306,

“The Hypocrisy of Signs: Hermeneutics of Action and Belief in the Aftermath of the Sephardic Diaspora (Italy and Catholic Europe, XVI-XVII centuries)” David Sebastiani (PhD Candidate, Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa, Italy) Each CMRS Research Workshop is based on a pre-circulated research paper that the presenter—who may be a CMRS faculty member, associate, affiliate, or graduate student—wishes to discuss with colleagues. All attendees must read the paper under consideration and be prepared to contribute to the discussion. Click here to register to…

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Hydrophilic Archives: Early Handmade Paper in Unstable Environments

January 16 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Ct
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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Richard & Mary Rouse Annual History of the Book Lecture Joshua Calhoun (Associate Professor of English, University of Wisconsin, Madison) Click here to register to attend. Paper loves water, but the hydrophilic property of paper is both a feature and a bug: it cannot be created without water, and it can be easily destroyed by water. This talk explores the revolutionary, vulnerable qualities of early handmade paper and considers the ecological resources we use to preserve the documentary evidence we have…

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William Caxton’s Multilingualism: The Claims of French and Dutch, English and Kentish

January 14 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Ct
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture This lecture by Professor Ad Putter (Professor of Medieval English and Director, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, University of Bristol) explores the multilingualism of England in the fifteenth century by examining the life and works of the first English printer, William Caxton. In standard histories of the English language, Caxton and the printing press appear as agents in the standardization of English, but Caxton’s language was in many ways unusual, and shows the impact of…

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December 2019

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“Ornament of the World” Film Screening

December 4, 2019 @ 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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Please click here to register to attend. No fee. limited seating. The Ornament of the World tells a story from the past that’s especially timely today: the story of a remarkable time in history when Muslims, Christians and Jews forged a common cultural identity that frequently transcended their religious differences. Ornament will retrace a nearly 800-year period in medieval Spain, from the early 8th through late 15th centuries, during which the three groups, though they competed and sometimes fought, managed for the most…

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The Future of al-Andalus

December 3, 2019 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Royce Hall 306,

This talk is based on Professor Calderwood's current book project, which examines representations of al-Andalus (medieval Muslim Iberia) in contemporary literature, film, television, music, and tourism. Eric Calderwood is an Associate Professor in the Program in Comparative and World Literature at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is the author of Colonial al-Andalus: Spain and the Making of Modern Moroccan Culture (Harvard University Press, 2018). His articles have appeared in PMLA, The Journal of North African Studies, International Journal of Middle East Studies, and Journal of…

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November 2019

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Shakespeare Among the Boars: Translating Desire in Renaissance Literature

November 20, 2019 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
314 Royce Hall, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture Professor Ivan Lupić (English, Stanford University). “Had I been toothed like him ,” says Venus in Shakespeare’s 1593 narrative poem, “with kissing him I should have killed him first.” We learn from the rest of the poem that Adonis has been transformed into a flower and that Venus has gone to immure herself at Paphos, but we do not learn what happened to the boar. The loving boar’s fate had, however, been the subject of…

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