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March 2017

Speed Dating (Artifacts) In Ancient Egypt

March 23 @ 12:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Ever wanted to know how to date an Egyptian statue? What makes an Amenhotep III face recognizable? How can you tell if a piece was recarved? What about the dating of Egyptian non-royal objects? This workshop will teach some of the tricks of the trade – using the shape of an eye, or a drooping lotus, or a distinctive belly button – as well as introducing the standards of portraiture. Come and learn to date Egyptian artifacts like a pro.

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King Richard III: the Resolution of a 500-Year-Old Cold Case

March 16 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

King Richard III was one of the few English kings for whom the precise location of his grave had been lost. In 2012, during an excavation, his putative remains were found underneath a carpark in Leicester. Dr Turi King led the genetic analysis which led to the identification of the remains as those of King Richard III. Turi King, PhD (Reader in Genetics and Archaeology, University of Leicester) will discuss the case from the very beginning covering the archaeology, osteology,…

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Poetry and Music Night

March 15 @ 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm

The UCLA Department of Slavic, East European and Eurasian Languages and Cultures invites you to its annual 

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“La magia de Galicia: la mirada animal en la literatura” – A lecture by Manuel Rivas

March 15 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
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“La magia de Galicia: la mirada animal en la literatura” – A lecture by Manuel Rivas

March 15 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
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“O Manchester, so much to answer for”: Fates of the Literary in an Industrial Revolution, 1780-1830

March 15 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

—a lecture by Jon Mee, University of York co-hosted by the UCLA English Department and the Center for 17th- & 18th-Century StudiesThe manufacturing towns of the north of England were the shock cities of their age. Literary history, especially in the period 1780–1830, usually associates them with dark satanic mills, a time and place when the “human” was sacrificed to the “machine,” or the “mathesis,” as Catherine Gallagher puts it, of Malthus’s dark materialism (itself an idea that emerged from…

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Bryant Kirkland | The Painter and the Mirror: Plutarch and Lucian Confront Herodotus

March 13 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
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Workshop | “Exploring Classical Reception in the National Epics of South America”

March 10 @ 11:30 am - 1:00 pm
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Medieval Books – Torn, Fetid, and Dripped On

March 9 @ 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture Is it possible to derive historical meaning from the grubby fingerprints and torn leaves that scholars find inside medieval books? Can surviving medieval manuscripts be matched to contemporary accounts of the mistreatment of books – those of Geoffrey Chaucer, whose Wife of Bath famously tears leaves from her husband’s book; or those of the fourteenth-century bibliophile Richard de Bury, whose medieval reader’s “nails are stuffed with fetid filth as black as jet” and whose “nose, running…

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Adriana Vazquez | “Sacred Words: Reading Augustan Poetry through the Lens of Mystery Cult”

March 9 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
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Free

From the Arc of Ascent to the Arc of Descent: Writings of Baha’u’lla, the Founder of Baha’I Faith

March 9 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

Please RSVP Here

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CANCELED–Monarch, Maiden & Fool: The Book of Esther in Early Modern German, English, & Yiddish Drama

March 8 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

CMRS Lecture CANCELED– to be rescheduled. Scholars of Yiddish literature have proposed that the first extant Purim-Shpil (Purim Play) continued the tradition of early modern English and German dramatizations of the Book of Esther. In this talk, Professor Chanita Goodblatt (Foreign Literatures & Linguistics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) will focus on the carnivalesque aspect of these plays, involving issues of misrule, as well as the social and political consequences of what Joy Wiltenburg terms “Disorderly Women and Female Power.”…

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The Anatomy of Loyalty and Patterns of Patronage in the Religio-political Culture of Sixteenth Century Iran

March 8 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Dr. Khafipour discusses the spiritual dimensions of political loyalty that was instrumental in the formation of strong ties between the Safavid rulers and their chiefs at the epicenter of the order, where power was continually contested. Drawing on a wide variety of historical and literary sources, Islamic theology, and theories of power, he discusses the anatomy of political loyalty among the early Safavids within the context of early modern state formation and posits that hierarchies of spiritual power inherent in…

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The Anatomy of Loyalty and Patterns of Patronage in the Religio-political Culture of Sixteenth Century Iran

March 8 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Dr. Khafipour discusses the spiritual dimensions of political loyalty that was instrumental in the formation of strong ties between the Safavid rulers and their chiefs at the epicenter of the order, where power was continually contested. Drawing on a wide variety of historical and literary sources, Islamic theology, and theories of power, he discusses the anatomy of political loyalty among the early Safavids within the context of early modern state formation and posits that hierarchies of spiritual power inherent in…

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Beautiful Blackness: Representing Black Sanctity in the Early Modern Catholic Atlantic

March 8 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Early Modern Cosmopolitanisms Lecture —Erin Kathleen Rowe, Johns Hopkins University Erin Kathleen Rowe’s current research traces the rise and circulation of devotion to black saints throughout the early modern Catholic world. Some of the key sources for the centrality of cults of black saints in early modern devotion are the surviving images—almost all polychrome sculpture dating from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. In this lecture Rowe focuses on sculpture of Saints Benedict of Palermo, Efigenia, and Elesbaan found in Iberian…

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“Translatio imperii”: The Formation of Emotive Literary Identities & Mentalities in the North

March 6 @ 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

The importation of French courtly material in thirteenth-century Norway and Iceland completes a cycle  of cultural transmission and expansion begun almost four centuries earlier with the Viking expansion  outward from the Northern peripheries of the known world to the neighbouring insular regions of the  British Isles, to Northern France and finally to the medieval centre of the world, Jerusalem. This talk by Sif Rikhardsdottir (University of Iceland) addresses the way in which such cross-cultural literary exchange partakes in the formation…

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Iran-China Relations in a Changing World

March 5 @ 4:00 pm - 6:00 pm

A lecture in Persian As two great civilizations with an illustrious imperial past, Iran and China have a long history of trade, political and cultural ties that go back to the ancient Silk Road more than 2100 years ago.  Islam was introduced to China by Persian speaking Muslims.  Currently, China has more than 30 million Muslims living primarily in the Western part of the country. Against this historical backdrop, Iran and China have witnessed an impressive expansion of their bilateral…

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$25

Chamber Music at the Clark: Ian Parker, pianist

March 5 @ 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Born in Vancouver to a family of pianists, Ian Parker began his piano studies at age three with his father, Edward Parker. He earned Bachelor and Master of Music degrees from the Juilliard School, where he was a student of Yoheved Kaplinksky. While at Juilliard, the Canada Council for the Arts awarded him the  Sylva Gerber Career grant, which is given annually to the “most talented Canadian artist.” A first-prize winner at the CBC National Radio Competition, he also won…

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The Ark After Noah: Beasts, Books, and Bodies of Knowledge

March 3 - March 4

This two-day symposium hosted at the University of California, Los Angeles and the J. Paul Getty Museum brings together scholars working on the aspects of image, text, knowledge, and culture that surround the bestiary tradition in the medieval world. Speakers will focus on how the development of encyclopedic texts and new structures of knowledge emerged on the manuscript page in and alongside bestiaries. Organized by Matthew Fisher (Associate Professor of English, UCLA) and Elizabeth Morrison (Senior Curator of Manuscripts, J.…

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2017 ucLadino Conference Day 2

March 2 @ 9:00 am - 4:30 pm
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