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February 2018

Film Screening: WHITE GOD (Hungary/Germany/Sweden, 2014)

February 24 @ 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Co-presented by UCLA Film & Television Archive and the Center for European and Russian Studies EUROPE IN FOUR THEMES: ANIMALS UCLA Film & Television Archive and the Center for European and Russian studies have partnered this year to present a quarterly, interdisciplinary  festival of film and music, in collaboration with the Getty Center, that explores European culture, politics and society through the prism of four themes: Animals, Food, Music and Architecture/Landscape. Every calendar, the Archive will a devote a weekend…

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Sonnets & Sonatas: ANIMALS!

February 24 @ 7:30 pm - 8:30 pm

How do artists and composers evoke, imitate, mock, or pay tribute to animals, which are both our best companions and, at the same time, radically different from us? This lecture-concert featuring a presentation by Laure Murat, professor of French and Francophone Studies at UCLA, and performances of works by Rimsky-Korsakov, Fauré, Rameau, Rossini, Cage, Gershwin, and others, attempts to answer this question. The program features the first U.S. appearance of Vincent Penot, clarinetist of the Opéra de Paris, who performs…

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Film Screening: HEART OF A DOG (Soviet Union, 1988)

February 25 @ 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm

Co-presented by UCLA Film & Television Archive and the Center for European and Russian Studies EUROPE IN FOUR THEMES: ANIMALS UCLA Film & Television Archive and the Center for European and Russian studies have partnered this year to present a quarterly, interdisciplinary  festival of film and music, in collaboration with the Getty Center, that explores European culture, politics and society through the prism of four themes: Animals, Food, Music and Architecture/Landscape. Every calendar, the Archive will a devote a weekend…

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Duke John’s Skull: From History Lesson to Crime Exhibit

February 26 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm

CMRS Roundtable In the aftermath of the assassination of Duke John of Burgundy (1419), a pivotal event in the Hundred Years’ War, the duke’s shattered skull became a famous bone of contention in disputes about the past. The controversial skull was kept by Carthusian monks and shown as a curiosity to visiting royalty until the Revolution. Modernity turned this unholy relic and macabre symbol of national disaster into a scientific specimen. It was repeatedly exhumed and studied, sketched and photographed,…

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